Dictionary of Irish Architects 1720 - 1940

Sculptor, of Belfast, active in the 1870s. According to the Irish Builder, 'Mr Alex. Steven' carved the botanical motifs on WILLIAM BATT [2]' WILLIAM BATT [2]' s Venetian Gothic gate lodge at the Botanic Gardens, Belfast, completed in 1879.(1) He is probably the same person as the 'Mr Stevens' who executed the carving - excluding the portrait medallions - on the fa├žade of the Theatre Royal, Belfast (1871)(2) and on the Fitzroy Avenue Presbyterian church, Belfast (1874).(3)



References



(1) IB 21, 1 Apr 1879, 100; C.E.B. Brett, Buildings of Belfast (2nd ed., 1985), 55.
(2) IB 13, 15 Oct 1871, 262.
(3) IB 16, 15 Apr 1874, 116.


5 work entries listed in chronological order for STEVEN, ALEXANDER *


Sort by date | Sort alphabetically


Building: CO. ANTRIM, BELFAST, ARTHUR SQUARE, THEATRE ROYAL
Date: 1871a
Nature: Carving by 'Stevens'.
Refs: IB 13, 15 Oct 1871, 262

Building: CO. ANTRIM, BELFAST, FITZROY AVENUE (& UNIVERSITY STREET), PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Date: 1874a
Nature: Carving by 'Mr Stevens'.
Refs: IB 16, 15 Mar 1874, 116

Building: CO. ANTRIM, BELFAST, STRANMILLIS ROAD, BOTANIC GARDEN
Date: 1879a
Nature: AS carved botanical motifs on William Batt's gate lodge.
Refs: IB 21, 1 Apr 1879, 100; C.E.B. Brett, Buildings of Belfast (2nd ed., 1985), 55.

Building: CO. ANTRIM, BELFAST, DONEGALL SQUARE WEST, WAREHOUSE (WILLIAM KIRK & PARTNERS)
Date: 1882
Nature:  Carving on doorway to Donegall Square. by Alexander Steven.
Refs: IB 24, 1 Sep 1882, 249,253(illus.); Marcus Patton, Central Belfast: an historical gazetteer (UAHS, 1993), 121-2;  Paul Harron, Architects of Ulster: Young & Mackenzie, a transformational provincial practice 1850-1960 (Ulster Architectural Heritage Society, 2016), 244..

Building: CO. ANTRIM, BELFAST, DONEGALL SQUARE WEST, WAREHOUSE (WILLIAM KIRK & PARTNERS)
Date: 1882
Nature:  Carving on doorway to Donegall Square. by Alexander Steven.
Refs: IB 24, 1 Sep 1882, 249,253(illus.); Marcus Patton, Central Belfast: an historical gazetteer (UAHS, 1993), 121-2;  Paul Harron, Architects of Ulster: Young & Mackenzie, a transformational provincial practice 1850-1960 (Ulster Architectural Heritage Society, 2016), 244..