Dictionary of Irish Architects 1720 - 1940

Assistant surveyor under Commanding Royal Engineers, Ordnance Civil Branch, Dublin Castle, from 1844 or earlier until 1847 or later. By 1853 he had been replaced by ROBERT SANDS ROBERT SANDS . His name appears in the lists of architects in the classified sections of Pettigrew & Oulton's and Thom's directories between 1845 and 1850, with a home address at 6 Cambridge Terrace, Rathgar.

In the Office of Public Works Drawings Collection in the National Archives there is a design for a neo-classical gateway and guard room with cells above it for Ship Street Barracks, which bears four signatures with different dates in 1847 and 1848. 'Richard Cuming, Dept. Surveyor' signed the drawing on 19 August 1847. Cuming was also responsible for designing the garrison chapel at Arbour Hill, Dublin, under the 'direction' of Major General Griffith George Lewis, of the Royal Engineers, who published the designs and specifications in Papers on subjects connected with the duties of the Corps of Royal Engineers in 1852.  A print of a design by Cuming for a constabulary barracks for a rural subdistrict is among the Clements papers in the collection of J.R. Stewart & Sons in the National Library of Ireland,(1)  while designs for a' Constabulary Barrack for a rural district to accommodate 1 Constable and 11 men' is in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.(2)

Cuming was married to Mary Shute and had at least two children, a son, Edward Oldry Cuming, and a daughter, Elizabeth.(3)

See WORKS.



References



(1) A.P.W. Malcomson, The Clements Archive (Dublin: Irish Manuscripts Commission, 2010), 653. 
(2) Undated plans, elevations and sections in PRONI, D2977/37/20/1A,B (see PRONI e-catalogue).
(3) Irish Genealogy, churchrecords.irishgenealogy.ie (last visited Oct 2010).


3 work entries listed in chronological order for CUMING, RICHARD CLEVERTON


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Building: CO. DUBLIN, DUBLIN, ARBOUR HILL, BARRACKS CHAPEL
Date: 1845-48
Nature: Designed by RCC under 'direction' of Maj. Gen. G.G. Lewis; who took his idea for the external features of the church from 'a church lately built in the west of England' which had its stairs placed outside body of building. Contractor: Gilbert Cockburn. (See also Christine Casey, The Buildings of Ireland: Dublin (2005), 246n.)
Refs: Plans and specifications (dated Apr 1845) in G.G. Lewis, 'Description of a military chapel, built for part of the garrison of Dublin', Papers on subjects connected with the duties of the Corps of Royal Engineers New series, 2 (1852), 25-33;  record drawings in Military Archives, Dublin; Maps. Plans and Drawings Collection;  Kenneth Ferguson, 'The Garrison Church, Arbour Hill', Irish Sword Vol. 25, No. 100 (Winter, 2006), 145-148

Building: CO. DUBLIN, DUBLIN, ARBOUR HILL, MILITARY PRISON
Date: 1846-7
Nature: Drawings for prison, governor's house and chapel signed by Lt. Col. Savage and. RCC. another drawing for chapel, 1850 is signed by RE draughtsman falled B.R. Baker.
Refs: Christine Casey, The Buildings of Ireland: Dublin (2005), 246n.

Building: CO. DUBLIN, DUBLIN, ARBOUR HILL, MILITARY PRISON
Date: 1846-7
Nature: Drawings for prison, governor's house and chapel signed by Lt. Col. Savage and. RCC. another drawing for chapel, 1850 is signed by RE draughtsman falled B.R. Baker.
Refs: Christine Casey, The Buildings of Ireland: Dublin (2005), 246n.